XenoxQ

My name is Sara, I'm MtF soon to be on HRT. I love people and cats.

nostalgic-dreaming:

when someone says “ten years ago” i think about the 90’s not 2003

(via neverlands-nightmare)

itsawonderfulhealthylife:

lestradeisasilverfox:

Nathan Fillion is not appreciated enough.

Nathan Fillion must be protected at all costs.

(via neverlands-nightmare)

wehaveallgotknives:

monetizeyourcat:

weloveshortvideos:

i’ve watched this like 17 times

who beatboxes at a goat

a wise person

(via worldsweirdesttransgirl)

kazoo-goddess:

GTOTO GO FSAT

(Image source)

(via kazoo-goddess)

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

(Source: daughtersofdig, via woomanwhoa)

Sara’s Moving Giveaway

xenoxq:

Hello followers/people who may see this other places! I’m moving soon and I need to clean out so toys from when I was a kid, and I like mailing stuff. 

Anyway just like or reblog (once is fine) and you’ll be entered. I’ll choose a winner at the end of the month (july) and mail it out soon after!

The only stuff I have so far (lots more will come, but they’ll be surprises) are these transformers like things: 

image

image

Also if I get enough response I’ll either do another one or maybe I’ll split the random crap I find between a few people. So have fun and do what you will!

(via xenoxq)

Sometimes art makes it and sometimes it does not. This is the case of a piece that was a slow broil. It wasn’t used as our official poster but it is now going to be spray painted in the senior mural. I feel it gets to the point I really wanted from it. #evita #wmchs #art

thesleepybeeper:

konekoealain:

fuzzybabygriffinchicks:

what show is this i nEED TO KNOW

Yoshihiko and the Demon King’s Castle is a brilliant work of art and everyone needs to watch it.

so gonna watch this. :3

(Source: requiem-for-you, via 62bitgaming)